At last – significant, coordinated research into the WHYs of RA!

October 9, 2013 at 11:27 am | Posted in arthrits, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, joint pai, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 3 Comments
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Look around the RA blogging community for a while and you’ll see some consistent themes. One is that it’s hard to explain to Joe Public what RA is – another is that most of the drugs are by-products of research into other diseases (methotrexate for example, and most of the biologics were developed as cancer treatments) and there is little fundamental research into RA.

That picture has been getting better over the last few years, and it’s taking another step in the right direction. Arthritis Research UK, along with the Universities of Glasgow, Newcastle and Birmingham,  is funding a major new initiative, the Rheumatoid Arthritis Pathogenesis Centre of Excellence, to be run from Glasgow. The centre’s main focus will be on why RA starts, why it attacks the joints, and why it doesn’t stop. These are fundamental questions, basic science, but the answers, if they can find them, are likely to lead to a host of potential new treatments.

As I understand it the ‘centre’ is virtual rather than physical, but it will mean the three universities and other partners undertaking major collaborations into these fundamental areas.

Science is a slow business – results may be a long time coming – but it’s great to know that there is a good level of funding for this fundamental research into rheumatoid arthritis.

And remember – if you’re based in the UK too, you can get 20% of Physicool products until 9 November 2013.

Physicool products – 20% off

October 7, 2013 at 1:51 pm | Posted in arthrits, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, joint pai, fibromyalgia, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 4 Comments
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Further to my review of a Physicool cooling bandage, I’m delighted to announce that the company are offering 20% off to anyone putting in the code ‘penguin‘ into the coupons option at the checkout, until 9 November 2013.

At the moment this only applies to readers in the UK.

Physicool

Please note: I do not work for this company or stand to make any profit from this in any way. I found it a useful product and if you choose to use this promotion then I hope you do too!

Ankle pain … but not RA?

October 7, 2013 at 1:26 pm | Posted in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 7 Comments

I have had very severe ankle pain since Thursday – but I don’t think it can be RA because it’s on the outside of my ankle. My anatomy is pretty poor but I’ve done some Google searches and some reading and I don’t think the outside ankle joint is a synovial joint – no synovial joint, presumably no RA? Could it just be a sprain? I don’t see how because I have no recollection of spraining it or going over on that ankle or anything, so I really don’t know what’s going on.

I have been pretty unsuccessful at keeping it up – I did keep it up for most of Friday and cancelled work and two different plans to see friends, but when it came to cancelling our wedding anniversary plans I … erm … forgive the fun … put my foot down! We had a lovely wedding anniversary lunch in Norwich on Saturday – but maybe pounding round the shops beforehand wasn’t such a great idea? Although having said that, we did buy a new bed, which is something that’s been on the list for quite a while and which could help with all these problems, since it’s always worst at night.

Now there’s a thing – I’d figured (until I started looking up ankles in Wikipedia etc.!) that it must be RA because it was either RA or osteo and osteo would be worse if I walked on it, not at night in bed … but now I’m thinking perhaps I’ve just sprained something.

Any thoughts to help out a confused Penguin would be much appreciated!

Of course, like the recent hip pain, I’ll be delighted it if it isn’t RA-related as I needn’t start panicking that the methotrexate isn’t doing its job!

Review – Physicool – it sure is cool!

October 1, 2013 at 4:57 pm | Posted in arthrits, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, joint pai, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 3 Comments
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The nice folks at Physicool asked me to review their cooling bandage combination pack. I said I’d be very happy to do so provided they didn’t mind a completely honest review – and they kindly agreed and sent me a pack to try out. So here goes:

What is Physicool?

Physicool is a rapid evaporant which can be poured or sprayed onto their bandages. The liquid quickly evaporates into the air, drawing away the heat from the inflamed area and creating a cooling effect,

What is the combination pack?

The combination pack that Ian at Physicool sent me consists of a 3m long bandage and a 500 ml bottle of coolant. The bandage comes in its own small foil packet with coolant already applied, and that packet and the coolant bottle are packaged in another foil packet.

Combination Pack Shot 2

Opening the packs

On first use the seal along the top of both packages has to be torn off. My arthritis hands struggled slightly with the larger pack, but not much, and the smaller pack tore easily. Each pack is then sealed with a typical push-together plastic seal – not sure what those are called but you hopefully get the idea! These open easily.

Applying the bandage

The bandage has to first be squeezed to remove any excess evaporant, but it doesn’t need a very hard squeeze so that didn’t prove a challenge. I used the bandage on my knee – although I had a ‘size A’ bandage which is more appropriate for wrists, ankles etc. The knee was where I had the inflammation though, and actually the size was fine. The bandage is neatly rolled inside the bag and easy to unwind and apply. It has a velcro-style strip which can be attached to itself or to the bandage.

What I liked

  • It works. It cooled the inflamed area really, REALLY fast and that meant the pain went away fast.
  • The bandage is easy to apply.
  • I only needed to use it for half an hour – after that I took off the bandage and my knee still felt really cool for another half an hour. But it should last for up to two hours – and it can then be re-charged and you can carry on using it.
  • It’s portable. I use an ice pack normally but I can’t use that at work because we have no freezer in the building! This is something I can keep at work, and also take on holiday. Fantastic!
  • The coolant supplied with the bandage should last for up to two hours of use – so I’ve got four applications in the bandage before I need to recharge.
  • There should be enough coolant in the recharge bottle for around 8 more thirty-minute uses.
  • The packs are quite easy to open and the bandage was easy to apply and it didn’t slip once I’d put it in place.

What I didn’t like

  • It’s wet. Well, it would have to be of course, because if it wasn’t it wouldn’t evaporate! However, because it is a rapid evaporant it doesn’t feel wet for long.
  • It has a smell. It’s not a bad smell, but it’s definitely a smell. No smell at all would be perfect, but if it has to smell this isn’t a particularly unpleasant one – just very slightly hospitally!
  • It needs to be exposed to the air to work effectively – otherwise it can’t evaporate so well, of course. This means that whichever bit of you is using the bandage has to be uncovered. Not a problem if you want it to be cool, you may think, but what if the knee’s the problem and the only way to ‘expose it’ is to roll up your trousers? that leaves you with a cold ankle and calf.
  • Because it needs to be exposed to the air, when I used it on my knee and then put my leg up, the underneath part was against my footrest, not exposed to the air. This meant I had a wet patch for a while under my leg after I took the bandage off. It did evaporate though!

Do the benefits outweigh the irritations?

DEFINITELY!  Now that I know what the ‘problems’ are for me, I can work around most of them. I can make sure I have a small blanket to cover any bits I don’t want exposed, and if I put my leg up, for instance, I can put it on a foot stool and leave the actually knee unsupported to avoid a wet patch. As to the smell and the temporary wetness – considering how incredibly effective this is at cooling the painful area – I can live with those.

Want to know more?

Watch

They have a page about Physicool and arthritis here. Or visit the websites – physicool.co.uk in the UK, physicool.us in the US, or go to physicool.com to find a local distributor where you are.

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