NICE is as blinkered as ever: nothing has changed since 2010

June 25, 2015 at 6:34 pm | Posted in arthrits, rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 1 Comment
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In January 2010 I ‘reported’ that NICE were refusing to consider treatment of early RA with biologics because one had to ‘fail’ on two other DMARDS first, which would take a minimum of six months, more likely a year. NICE (amusing standing for National Institute for Clinical Excellence, actually have very little interest in clinical excellence; their job is to stop the NHS ‘spending too much’ on drugs etc.)

Now, five-and-a-half years later, after threatening to take biologics away from RA patients altogether because they weren’t ‘cost effective’, NICE has kindly decided to leave things as they are for the moment, according to to a joint press release from NRAS, Arthritis Care and the British Society of Rheumatology (BSR), which you can read here on the BSR website (and also on the NRAS and Arthritis Care sites).

I was pleased to see that Professor Simon Bowman, the President of the BSR, is saying pretty much what I was saying five-and-a-half years ago … because there’s a chance that people at NICE might actually listen to him! He says, quoting the press release:

‘It is false economy not to treat patients with moderate disease with biologic therapy when standard DMARDS fail, as these patients will be higher users of healthcare resources. These patients will require more attendance to primary and secondary care, and are more likely to develop co-morbidities such as osteoporosis, heart disease and have more surgery.’

The press release continues with more things I was saying back then: ‘They are also much more likely to lose their jobs, causing financial hardship […] The personal costs to the individual, the NHS, the impact on the rest of their family and the direct cost to the exchequer in lost productivity and benefits claims is massive.’

Judi Rhys, Chief Executive of Arthritis Care, added ‘NICE does not take account of costs such as reduced hospital bed days or the benefit of people getting back into work. We believe those with moderate RA require better access to these drugs. Not only will it improve lives, but it also makes economic sense.’

Here here! It’s good to see the charities fighting back in language that NICE might understand! Of course it won’t alter the problem that the NHS is completely ‘siloed’ from the Department for Work and Pensions who deal with benefits etc., social services etc. So as far as NICE is concerned, as long as the NHS is ‘saving money’, the fact that there are huge costs to individuals, businesses, the DWP etc. is really irrelevant.

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  1. This is a great piece, it’s all so true. A good read that I will share for sure. RA has been a struggle for me as well. I have turned to Tai Chi to help calm my nerves and it feels great! Paul Lam’s book Born Strong is on my nightstand, and I gain some great motivation from it. Well worth the read if you are dealing with arthritis and everything associated with it.


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