Good news and bad news … and good news …

January 29, 2018 at 10:38 am | Posted in arthrits, arthrits, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, joint pai, crafting, joint pai, rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 8 Comments
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Well the good news is that my poor, neglected blog has been poor and neglected since RA Blog Week in September of last year because I have been really well! I’ve had the odd hip pain but only when in bed, which means I never remember to ask the doc about it because when I’m awake, I’m fine! Other than that I’ve been OK. In fact at the beginning of the month my regular 6-monthly hospital appointment was cancelled at the last minute because the doc was sick. The beleaguered receptionist rang to let me know and to apologise and was very pleasantly surprised when I said, ‘That’s fine – saves me coming in on a horrible, foggy morning and waiting around!’ ‘Oh,’ she said, ‘that’s not the reaction I’ve had so far!’ I pointed out that I felt fine and was busy at work and delighted not to have to waste all our time and she said, ‘You’re the sort of person I LIKE to ring!’ I wished her luck with the rest of the calls and that was that.

The following week I had a day off to do a textile workshop, which was great fun. (I was learning, not teaching. My last attempt at teaching was risible and should be enough to put me off teaching a workshop for probably another 10 years or so!) At the end of the day though I had TERRIBLE lower back pain – one of the worst pains I’ve ever had. I just didn’t know what to do with myself. Luckily after an early night it settled in to unpleasant but not terrible lower back pain for the next week or so. The very day after that back pain started I had my regular monthly blood test, which I thought no more about.

That week I had an email from my friend Carla emailed me to point out that my blog was woefully out of date (and other stuff, but that was definitely a significant part of the email!) Stupidly I said, ‘Oh, that’s ’cause I’m fine! Nothing to blog about!’ I should probably have touched wood, crossed flippers and said kein aiyn hara (and anything else superstitious you can think of) but I didn’t!

Now, here’s the interesting thing. (‘Yay, finally, something interesting,’ I hear you cry.) My bloods, which are never, never, NEVER up, even when I’m having a serious flare, were somewhat up the day after the back problem started. I didn’t know this until a knee flare started the following week and I limped into the doc with my stick.

‘How are you today?’ the very pleasant, if slightly odd-looking, locum doc I’d never seen before asked cheerfully!

‘Oh, fine, on the whole,’ I replied, equally cheerfully, ‘except see the stick? Well I have rheumatoid arthritis’ (knowing the chance of his having read any notes was minimal!) ‘but I normally walk find and don’t need a stick. I’m having a bad flare in my left knee …and the right one’s not perfect either.’

‘Hmmm, let’s have a look. Ah, did you know your bloods were up this month?’

‘No! That’s intriguing, they’re never up!’ And I explained that even when I flare horribly there’s normally nothing to show in the bloods, so even a slight raise, as this was, was interesting. But I didn’t connect it with the back problem, or the fact that they were up a week before the knee flare … brain not fully functioning due to a couple of poor nights’ sleep thanks to knee pain!

‘Hmm, what do you usually do when this happens?’

‘Steroids – prednisilone’.

‘Hmm,’ (his favourite word I think), ‘Well that’s not ideal!’

So I looked him straight in the eye, which was kinda hard ’cause he was an odd-looking chap, but that’s neither here nor there, and said, ‘Oh … so what is ideal then?’

Didn’t even get a hmm that time, more of an ‘Uh … uh … uh … erm…’ followed by, ‘are you on any regular medication for it?’ See, told you he wouldn’t have looked at the notes! So I explained about methotrexate and hydroxychlorquine and he said, ‘Has anyone talked to you about tweaking your methotrexate dose?’

‘Yes of course, in the 11 years I’ve had this it’s been altered many times but that doesn’t really help with a short-term flare that needs to be cleared up so that I can carry on living/working,’ or words to that effect.

‘Hmmmmm … let’s see … when did you last have steroids?’

‘Ages ago?’

‘Oh heavens yes, two-and-a-half years ago!’

‘Really, surely not that long!’

‘Hmmm… oh my mistake, one-and-a-half years ago. Oh well, in that case we can hardly say you’re overusing them. Shall we go for it then?’

‘I think we should!’ Metaphorically wiping my forehead in relief to have come to sensible conclusion.

So we went for it. But of course in my anxiety to get something proper sorted out for the knee I completely forgot about the back (or hips for that matter) again.

Six-and-a-half HOURS later I was able to pick up the steroids from the chemist and finally get some proper treatment for the knee. (Once upon a time your doc would print out the scrip, sign it and give it to you. This must have added all of 30 seconds to the consultation time. Now, presumably to ‘save time’ the prescriptions have to go to a central place, get printed, are signed by some other doc when he has the time, and then go over to the chemist. The other doctor doesn’t have time until the end of the day so you wait all day for something that needs treatment as early as possible. MADNESS!)

Anyhooo … I’m now left with a lot of questions and no one to answer them. I really, really hope I will never have back pain like that again and I just pulled a muscle and perhaps that caused an inflammatory response that got into the bloods and raised my ESR.  OR perhaps the back pain was actually referred knee pain, which can happen in that part of the back apparently. Or, perhaps, worst case, that was arthritis in the back and I’ll have another bout some time. Flippers crossed, toca medera (my Spanish teacher’s favourite phrase after madre mia!), kein aiyn hara that that won’t be the case!

And the final bit of good news? Well, the knee is responding extremely well to the steroids! So are the hips, which is a bit concerning … if they get back again I probably need to drag myself down to the doc again, but I think you can see from this post why i try not to do that too often!


Wow – where did that come from?

June 27, 2016 at 1:38 pm | Posted in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 3 Comments
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I haven’t posted for a while because I haven’t really had much to post about – health-wise I’ve been good. I’ve been a bit stiff in the mornings for the last few days, but nothing to write home (or indeed blog) about. Then today I woke up stiff and tired, having had a migraine try to start in the night (successfully stopped with drugs!) I really couldn’t wake up for an hour or so this morning – not literally, I got up, had breakfast, went to work, but felt really brain fuggy. (Can’t blame the methotrexate as I take it Monday evenings and it’s Monday morning!)

Then when I got up to go to lunch, or rather tried to, I started to stand up and ended up collapsed back in my chair. No dramatic pain or anything – I was just so all-over stiff that joints weren’t doing what they were supposed to do! So after sitting a minute or two and flexing various bits (luckily on my own in the office so no one to see how weird I looked) I managed to get up and go for a short walk. I’ve been trying to walk about 1.5 miles at lunchtime but today I didn’t make 0.5 miles! The stiffness did mostly ware off but I was left with significant pain in the good ol’ left knee, where I usually get a flare if I’m going to have one. I’m really hoping I’m not!

Perhaps it’s the stress of ‘Brexit’ – the ‘Wow – where did that come from?’ title could also apply to that and it seems that partially to blame (apart from racists, stupid people and perhaps a handful of people with genuine concerns) may be the polls (as opposed to the Poles, which a lot of East Anglia would like to blame, I’m sad to say). The polls kept saying we’d vote to stay, so people decided that it wouldn’t matter if they had a ‘protest vote’. ‘Let’s vote leave, just so the government can see we’re annoyed with them – we’ll end up staying anyway.’ I’ve actually heard people say it, and then there’s this http://article in the Independent. No doubt people like this thought they were being terribly clever and original, but you get enough people doing the same thing (not that original after all guys) and guess what, we end up voting Leave.

Never mind the embarrassment of waggling stiff limbs about randomly in front of people, I feel embarrassed to be English at the moment! (I would say British but the Scots voted to stay!)

Hopefully the stiffness and knee pain will be a short-term issue. Alas, the same cannot be said for the state of Britain!

Hopefully not the ‘new normal’ … and ‘now in other news …’

October 5, 2015 at 4:58 pm | Posted in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 7 Comments
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Well my knee is very definitely better – From being barely able to hobble across the room, one predniselone taper later and I’m almost back to normal – I’m back at work, doing my lunch-time walks again, carrying on as normal … almost. The things is I’m getting twinges in that knee after walks, and I haven’t dared try exercise other than walking yet, and it’s generally more painful and tender than it was – I still have huge tracts of time when it doesn’t hurt at all, I’m delighted to say, but it probably hurts more and more often than it did pre-flare. I don’t know yet whether that’s because things are still settling down after the flare – it’s been nearly two weeks now which is long for me but not long in the scheme of RA things – or whether there’s been some damage done to the knee and this is the way it’s going to be from now on.

Here’s hoping it’s the former!

As to non-RA related stuff, I’m very sad to have to say that ‘Enormous Cat’ died a few weeks ago. We miss him enormously! Well, Hubby and I do. Tiny Cat 2 isn’t the slightest bit bothered! ‘All the more crunchies for me’ I think is her attitude.

On the brighter side, we had a fabulous holiday to Whitby, where we were lucky enough to get a room upgrade in the very nice hotel and had a generally lovely, relaxing time, and, in spite of seriously steep hills, the RA pretty much behaved itself. I did wimp out of a really steep and windy trip up to see a waterfall … but it wasn’t as though we’d planned that anyway. We just stopped in a village cafe for a coffee, got chatting to a couple and their very friendly (and perpetually hungry dog) and he said ‘Have you been up to see it yet?’ And we said ‘See what’ and it turned out there was a fairly famous waterfall there. I did manage to see the wonderful Whitby Abbey, which I had been really wanting to visit for years.


The Yorkshire Moors were magnificent, and yes, we did have some good weather too, in spite of the Abbey photo above with the foreboding clouds!


And Castle Howard was deeply impressive … although the only bit I really liked was the Arts & Crafts Chapel – amazing! (The ‘new wing’, built in 17-something, was also nice, but the neoclassic earlier part of the house I personally found rather cold, although Hubby loved it!)


All in all a very fine holiday – but could have done with another week!

National Arthritis Week – 12-18 October in the UK

October 3, 2015 at 4:57 pm | Posted in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | Leave a comment
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It’s National Arthritis Week in the UK from 12-18 October and Arthritis Research UK are running a ‘story wall’ in its honour. My story (in 250 characters, which is a bit mad, but there you go, we’re the Twitter generation!) is up there somewhere on the wall – or will be soon. Why not go and put yours up too? You can see the wall here and put your own story up here.

10 million people live with Arthritis (in all its various forms) in the UK and Arthritis Research UK do a great job in supporting us, so I’m very happy to support them with their efforts for the week. They not only fund research, but also provide patient talks around the country so that we can find out what’s happening research-wise. Hubby and I went to a very interesting one a couple of months ago given by my very own rheumatologist – not that he recognised me – after, I haven’t had a six-monthly appointment for nearly two years, as the hospital keeps cancelling them – but that’s a whole nuther story! Posting about the stuff he was talking about is on my very long list of things to do!

I got latched on to by a very pleasant lady who tried to assure me that all I needed to do was take cider vinegar and honey to be cured. Strange that she was there and very clearly not cured, and yet still spouting this stuff. Funny, things people.

Anyway, I digress – please support Arthritis Week – there’s loads and loads of stories up on the wall already but the more the merrier, and it all goes towards helping arthritis research.

Review – Physicool – it sure is cool!

October 1, 2013 at 4:57 pm | Posted in arthrits, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, joint pai, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 3 Comments
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The nice folks at Physicool asked me to review their cooling bandage combination pack. I said I’d be very happy to do so provided they didn’t mind a completely honest review – and they kindly agreed and sent me a pack to try out. So here goes:

What is Physicool?

Physicool is a rapid evaporant which can be poured or sprayed onto their bandages. The liquid quickly evaporates into the air, drawing away the heat from the inflamed area and creating a cooling effect,

What is the combination pack?

The combination pack that Ian at Physicool sent me consists of a 3m long bandage and a 500 ml bottle of coolant. The bandage comes in its own small foil packet with coolant already applied, and that packet and the coolant bottle are packaged in another foil packet.

Combination Pack Shot 2

Opening the packs

On first use the seal along the top of both packages has to be torn off. My arthritis hands struggled slightly with the larger pack, but not much, and the smaller pack tore easily. Each pack is then sealed with a typical push-together plastic seal – not sure what those are called but you hopefully get the idea! These open easily.

Applying the bandage

The bandage has to first be squeezed to remove any excess evaporant, but it doesn’t need a very hard squeeze so that didn’t prove a challenge. I used the bandage on my knee – although I had a ‘size A’ bandage which is more appropriate for wrists, ankles etc. The knee was where I had the inflammation though, and actually the size was fine. The bandage is neatly rolled inside the bag and easy to unwind and apply. It has a velcro-style strip which can be attached to itself or to the bandage.

What I liked

  • It works. It cooled the inflamed area really, REALLY fast and that meant the pain went away fast.
  • The bandage is easy to apply.
  • I only needed to use it for half an hour – after that I took off the bandage and my knee still felt really cool for another half an hour. But it should last for up to two hours – and it can then be re-charged and you can carry on using it.
  • It’s portable. I use an ice pack normally but I can’t use that at work because we have no freezer in the building! This is something I can keep at work, and also take on holiday. Fantastic!
  • The coolant supplied with the bandage should last for up to two hours of use – so I’ve got four applications in the bandage before I need to recharge.
  • There should be enough coolant in the recharge bottle for around 8 more thirty-minute uses.
  • The packs are quite easy to open and the bandage was easy to apply and it didn’t slip once I’d put it in place.

What I didn’t like

  • It’s wet. Well, it would have to be of course, because if it wasn’t it wouldn’t evaporate! However, because it is a rapid evaporant it doesn’t feel wet for long.
  • It has a smell. It’s not a bad smell, but it’s definitely a smell. No smell at all would be perfect, but if it has to smell this isn’t a particularly unpleasant one – just very slightly hospitally!
  • It needs to be exposed to the air to work effectively – otherwise it can’t evaporate so well, of course. This means that whichever bit of you is using the bandage has to be uncovered. Not a problem if you want it to be cool, you may think, but what if the knee’s the problem and the only way to ‘expose it’ is to roll up your trousers? that leaves you with a cold ankle and calf.
  • Because it needs to be exposed to the air, when I used it on my knee and then put my leg up, the underneath part was against my footrest, not exposed to the air. This meant I had a wet patch for a while under my leg after I took the bandage off. It did evaporate though!

Do the benefits outweigh the irritations?

DEFINITELY!  Now that I know what the ‘problems’ are for me, I can work around most of them. I can make sure I have a small blanket to cover any bits I don’t want exposed, and if I put my leg up, for instance, I can put it on a foot stool and leave the actually knee unsupported to avoid a wet patch. As to the smell and the temporary wetness – considering how incredibly effective this is at cooling the painful area – I can live with those.

Want to know more?


They have a page about Physicool and arthritis here. Or visit the websites – in the UK, in the US, or go to to find a local distributor where you are.

I’m glad my doctor’s secretary is so kind

July 23, 2008 at 5:46 pm | Posted in Me, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 1 Comment
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Just went to the doctors to pick up a letter the doc said he’d write so that I could send it to the train company in the hopes they’ll refund the tickets for a trip to Wales I had planned, but had to cancel because of the state of my knee. ‘Pick it up early next week’ he said. So I thought well, I’ll leave it until Wednesday to make sure it’s done.

Went in this evening – explained to the receptionist. She looked in the file. ‘I’m sorry, it’s not here.’

‘He did say I should pick it up early in the week.’

‘Well it’s only Wednesday now love.’

‘Well to my mind early in the week means Monday or Tuesday, and I left it until today just to make sure it was done.’

‘Well it depends how you look at it really, doesn’t it love? Early in the week could mean Wednesday too.’

‘No, not really. I’d call that midweek.’

‘Oh well, nothing I can do I’m afraid – it’s not here.’

‘Well could you at least check my notes to see if he’s made a note to do it?’

‘Well … I don’t know if …’ Sees the steam coming out of my ears, ‘Well, I’ll have a look … Oh, well it says here it was done yesterday. Thing is the secretaries have all gone home now and perhaps they haven’t typed it yet. The only thing I can suggest is that you call and ask for Dr Dashes secretary, Debbie, tomorrow, and she’ll be able to tell you exactly what’s happened to it.’

So off I go, fuming and steaming, not to mention limping, only to get home and find a letter on the mat addressed to me. Open it and what do you think is inside? The letter from the doctor.

Soooo thoughtful of the secretary to realise that she’s writing a letter about someone with a very swollen and painful knee, and wouldn’t it be a kindness to post it? Such a pity the doctor wasn’t equally thoughtful … as he’d told me to pick it up.

There, feel better for the rant!

More importantly my knee is also finally on the mend – I think the steroid injection, however painful it was at the time, has really done the trick.

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