Blinking knee again!

July 26, 2017 at 9:01 pm | Posted in arthrits, arthrits, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, joint pai, joint pai, Me, rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 6 Comments
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Sorry – not my most inspirational blog post title, but I’m not feeling very inspired!

My knee has been playing up for a couple of weeks now – mostly the left one, as usual, with the occasional twinge in the right. At first I thought it had nothing to do with RA because the pain was in a different place – behind the knee, not to the front-right as ‘normal’, and there wasn’t much swelling … but over a couple of weeks the swelling has increased a lot (in its usual place) although the pain remained mostly behind the knee. My Pilates teacher (still loving the Pilates by the way) suggested it might be a pain caused by hyper-extending the knee, which I am prone to do, so  I spent a week very consciously NOT hyper-extending the knee and then realised that, given it was always significantly worse in the morning, and that it now involved significant swelling and  greatly reduced mobility, it was probably just good old RA again. So, today I plucked up the courage to phone the doctor. (It takes courage these days, believe me!)

It seems that the receptionists have now become triage nurses! I was not impressed. We used to get ‘Can you give me some indication of the problem if it’s not personal, so I can let the doctor know’ which was a reasonable request in my view. Today I got, ‘Can you give me a brief account of the problem please.’ Well it wasn’t personal so I said, ‘Yes, rheumatoid arthritis.’

‘Oh, you want pain relief then?’

‘No, it’s a bit more than that, I’m having an RA flare.’

‘Have you seen a physio? Do you think that might help?’

‘No, I don’t think so. I’m having a rheumatoid arthritis flare and I need to speak to a doctor.’

‘Oh … OK then …’

I actually wrote to the surgery via their contact form and told them what had happened and asked what training the receptionists, being non-medical staff, had if they were now supposed to be triaging to this extent. I said that I felt it was inappropriate and that the comments suggested a lack of understanding of the difference between RA and OA. I haven’t had a reply and I don’t expect one.

The doctor eventually phoned back at 11:30, meaning it was too late to go for the blood test that I should have gone for today, because you have to be there before 11! I explained the problem with my knee and he asked how long this flare had lasted. I explained that it’d been a while because I hadn’t twigged it was RA at first due to the pain being in a different place.

Now … this my American friends may find hard to swallow, but here goes … he asked about pain relief and I told him I was alternating paracetamol (Tylenol) and ibuprofen and it wasn’t cutting the mustard. He wondered about codeine and I said no (for stomach reasons). I asked about steroids and he said no, not yet, because ‘they can be problematic’ and then prescribed me a great big box of opioid pain relief tablets (meptazinol), 60 of the things! He said to try them out because if they helped it would be useful to know there was something else in my arsenal, which is true … and if they didn’t work, to come back next week and they would have me in for an examination and consider steroids … because all this was done over the phone.

So while you guys in the US can’t get an opioid for love or money now, or not without jumping through a million hoops, I just get handed 60 over the phone with a comment on the lines of ‘Don’t use them all at once. They’re only short term.’

He told me that the prescription would be with the pharmacy ‘in five minutes’. Luckily I took this with the pinch of salt it deserved because when I went to the pharmacy 1.5 hours later it had only just arrived!

Now he was probably, very sensibly, thinking ‘She’s had this two weeks, her flares rarely last even this long, it’ll probably be over in a few days and the pain relief will provide just that, relief, while it’s on its way out.’ And if he was thinking that, full marks to him because he’s probably right.

However, there’s a nasty, suspicious part of me that thinks even though the surgery says any comments and complaints won’t prejudice your treatment, he’s seen the comment I sent in and is thinking, ‘If I give her pain relief first, it makes what the receptionist originally said right …’ That’s probably nonsense – I’m prepared to admit to a tendency to be paranoid… but with the world going to pot in the way it seems to be at the moment, who knows!

I do have some comfort in the fact he’s a doctor I’ve seen before (actually face to face seen, a miracle these days) and do actually have some respect for, partly because I felt that he treated me as an intelligent person … so it’s far more likely he’s just easing me out of a flare with much reduced pain – and it IS much reduced. Of course it’s done nothing at all for the swelling or the lack of mobility in the joint, but it’s great to be relatively pain free and we’ll see how things go in the next few days.

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On the Third Day Before Christmas…

December 23, 2016 at 5:16 pm | Posted in Me, rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 10 Comments
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On the third day ‘fore Christmas my Arthur gave to me, a bad pain in my left knee.

On the second day ‘fore Christmas my Arthur gave to me, two swollen ankles, and a bad pain in my left knee.

Actually, to be strictly accurate, yesterday it was a bad right ankle, but that didn’t scan! Today’s verse is completely accurate, unfortunately. I had recovered nicely from the last flare after a few days, only to go down with a short, sharp and rather nasty stomach upset that put me in bed for a couple of days. This week I’ve been mostly OK, if a little stressed at work, and then suddenly on Wednesday everything at work went right, and I was unexpectedly able to finish for Christmas that afternoon – so hubby and I had a day out at Wells-Next-the-Sea on the North Norfolk coast. It was a glorious, sunny day – if rather cold – and we had a lovely time, except that as we were walking down the high street, suddenly I wasn’t … walking that is … or having a lovely time for that matter. I had a sudden and completely out of nowhere pain in my right ankle.

‘It’ll go in a minute,’ I said cheerful. ‘These sudden ankle pains always do. Let’s pop into this bookshop and get out of the cold while it gets better.’ Several minutes later and £20 lighter, the ankle hadn’t got better … although I had gained a rather fun read and got a little pressie for hubby too. So we walked (I hobbled, hubby walked) down to the harbour and had fish and chips while we waited for the ankle to mend … and it did … or so I thought. We had a lovely walk down the harbour wall but decided not to risk going the whole way (it’s a mile each way) in case the ankle went again. The sun shone, the lapwings called, the gulls squawked, the starlings sang beautifully in the hopes we’d feed them chips, and all was delightful.

Then when I got home the ankle started to twinge again. ‘It’ll be fine by the morning,’ I said confidently. (I don’t learn, do I?!) This morning it wasn’t terrible but it wasn’t good. This afternoon I decided to have a bath and see if that helped. It didn’t. By the time I got out of the bath BOTH ankles were flaring and I had knee pain too. And that’s where I’m at now.

On the bright side, I finished a felt picture I’ve been working on for a while and the hair dresser is coming soon so I can look slightly nicer than usual (not hard) for the first day of Hanukkah and then Christmas Day (aka 2nd day of Hanukkah this year), so it’s not all doom and gloom.

Happy Holidays everybody!

Ankles, Knees, Brain and Healthline

July 31, 2016 at 4:07 pm | Posted in arthrits, Me, rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 6 Comments
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First of all thank you to Healthline for selecting my blog as one of the best arthritis blogs of 2016, and congrats to my online (and in Carla‘s case actually met in person) friends who also achieved one. Good to see so many old friends listed, as well as Carla, Wren,  Cathy, Andrew, Amanda, Kelly and ‘Warm Socks’ also feature, and there are other blogs on there that I’m not familiar with and should take the time to get to know!

Now on to the body parts! My last post, a couple of weeks ago, stated that my knee was messing around again. Well I suspect there’s a little bit more permanent damage done each time I have a flare, and that knee has a lot of flares, but now it’s not not bad at all. Most of the time I’m having no problem – so long as I don’t walk into the printer table and bruise  the precise spot that I flare in, as I did last week!

Then last weekend my ankle suddenly went ‘weird’. I can’t think of a better way to describe it. It hurt in the night and when i got up in the morning it was really painful. There was a big swelling but not really over the ankle, rather at the front of the leg above the foot, but absolutely no heat. I used my Physicool ice bandage anyway and that helped. It stayed painful and difficult to walk on for two or three days and then it was magically better. I really don’t know what that was about or if it was RA or not – I just hope it doesn’t come back.

As to the brain, such as it is, it has been subjected to a lot of migraines lately, and although I have tablets that, if I take them in time, get rid of the head pain, I’m still left feeling unwell. Work is insanely busy at the moment, which is contributing to stress which in turn is probably contributing to migraines – a bit of a vicious circle as if I have to take time off for migraines then work gets even more hectic!

However, yesterday, for the first time in a couple of weeks, I actually felt well, normal and full of energy – hence finally getting round to post! I’m not QUITE so full of energy today but not bad. I think getting outside in the sunshine made a big difference! We went for a nice long walk along the seafront at Cromer on Friday evening and then yesterday morning I did some gardening and washed my car with hubby (for which read watched and occasionally waved a shammy over the car while hubby did the hard work) – thank you dear!

I’m just hoping this energy boost will last me through the next hectic week – because next Saturday I’m going to need to work or I’ll never fit everything in!

Two steps forward, one step back…

July 12, 2016 at 2:28 pm | Posted in arthrits, arthrits, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, joint pai, rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 10 Comments
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Well, yes, the knee flare was completely over … for a few days. I was just getting back into the swing of things, gradually building back up the length of my lunchtime walks from a few hundred yards to half a mile, to three-quarters of a mile … thinking I’d soon be back to the mile-and half … and then I woke up in the middle of last Friday night thinking ‘Ouch!’ I’m telling myself it’s not really flaring this time … I haven’t decided yet whether I’m lying to myself.

I certainly don’t want another dose of prednisolone just yet… if they’d even give me one, which I doubt. Having said I never have side effects, Carla happened to mention that sleeplessness and irritability are major side effects of pred, and guess what… I had a really sleepless and irritable week while I was on it – I just failed to attribute it to the pred. Now it all makes sense. And OMG, the night sweats!! I had no idea that was a side effect and I get hot flushes anyway so I just thought, ‘Coo, bad hot flushes, much worse than usual!’ I was slightly worried that this was more than hot flushes as the ‘sweats’ part was a whole lot more dramatic …again, I hadn’t realised this is a common side effect of the pred.

Now I’m still ALL for the steroids – the side effects, now I realise  that’s what they were, were horrible, but the flare was much, much worse. The side effects I personally experienced were definitely the lesser of two evils and the pred let me carry on with my life and work, which I couldn’t have done without it. However, having said that, it does make the thought of another does quite unappealing if it can be avoided.

This time round the knee’s not hot, it’s not especially swollen and it’s not actually madly painful … it’s stiff but bendable, so really quite different to the definite flare I recently experienced.

Remember those knee-strengthening exercises I was doing, so that if I flared again I would have strength in the surrounding muscles and hopefully come out of it faster? No? Well you wouldn’t because I forgot to post about them. Unfortunately I have also forgotten to do them for the last few months, which is a pity really because I suspect that’s what the problem is now. As a horribly unfit person, having a bit over a week practically off my feet  means I do need to build up those muscles etc. again and I think the minor pain and stiffness I’m experiencing is probably all about that.

So, spend goodness knows how long fighting for a doc appointment, to be told, if I’m lucky, that they’ll refer me to physio, which will take six weeks minimum, by which time I hope I’ll have recovered anyway, or just carry on and hope? I’m going for the latter at the moment. Wish me luck!

The frustrations of not having a relationship with your doctor

June 29, 2016 at 4:32 pm | Posted in arthrits, arthrits, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, joint pai, joint pai, Me, rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 7 Comments
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Thanks to the state of the NHS today (which, if you read this blog often you will know I harp on about endlessly) it is simply not possible to have a relationship with your GP these days (unless you’re incredibly lucky or live on some tiny island that actually has its own GP or something!) My GP practice has around 10 GPs plus locums. It’s pot luck who you get to speak to when you call and they phone you back, and then if they decide you should be seen you won’t see the person you spoke to that morning.

It also seems that they don’t have much of a relationship with the hospital and seem to have some sort of mythic belief in the power of the rheumatology helpline, as I’ve also mentioned before.

The myth

The patient calls the GP because they have an RA flare. This is a shocking waste of the GP’s time because these lucky, .lucky patients have an RA helpline that they can call and that will solve all their problems. They can speak to a lovely nurse* straight away and the nurse will wave her magic wand, waggle her magic pixie ears and solve the patient’s problem.

* Actually that’s the only true bit – the one we have at the moment IS a lovely nurse!

The facts

The lovely nurse, or even a secretary or receptionist, never EVER answers the helpline. It is an answerphone. That’s the way it’s set up. It’s not an answerphone on odd occasions when they’re exceptionally busy, it’s ALWAYS an answerphone. The message on the helpline says something like: ‘If you’re calling about a non-RA related problem, please call your GP. If you’re calling to change an appointment, please call reception. If you’re calling about an urgent need, please call your GP. If you’re calling to buy fish, please contact your fish monger. If you’re calling to moan about Brexit, please contact your MP. If you’re calling because you’re a moron, voted ‘Leave’ and can’t work out what a helpline is for, please call someone else and bother them. Now, if you really, really want to leave a message, we suppose you can. Give us your hospital number and name and telephone number and we’ll try to call you back in 24 hours – but no promises mind.’

I don’t know about you (actually I probably do, if you have RA) but I consider a flare pretty urgent.

While in an ideal world I would sit back on a couch, watch the telly and let my servants feed me grapes while I rested my knee and waited to see if it would clear up on its own, I do actually have a life (and no servants, and hubby is great but also has a life, and the cat just ain’t interested in helping), so I can’t just sit about and rest it. On that basis I can’t wait potentially 48 hours or more for the helpline to phone, and the nurse say, ‘Call your GP and get some prednisolone’ because then I can’t call the GP until Monday  as 48 hours is Friday morning and by the time I’ve heard back from the helpline the GP has run out of appointments. By that time I will have been flaring for over a week!

What Polly did Next

So … I went to the appointment grudgingly granted me by the grumpy GP. (Ooh, nice alteration that penguin!) Fortunately it’s with a much more pleasant locum GP than the one I spoke to on the phone. Unfortunately of course she doesn’t know me from Adam (or strictly speaking, as a doctor, she can probably spot I’m not Adam from the wobbly bits, so I should say she doesn’t know me from Eve). This means that she doesn’t know if I’m a moron or not, and therefore has to assume I am, as we always have to cater for the lowest common denominator.

‘How can I help you?’

‘I’m having an RA flare in my knees, as usually particularly in my left knee. It’s stiff, not very flexible and painful at times.’

‘Have you called the helpline, because really -‘

‘Yes.’

‘Oh, and what did they say?’

‘I said I’d called them, not that I’d spoken to them!’ I then explained, gently, ’cause she was a locum and therefore wouldn’t necessarily know any better, the realities of the helpline. (I didn’t mention Brexit or fish mongers.)

‘Hmm, you had a blood test only yesterday and your bloods were hardly elevated at all.’

‘They never are.’ The mere fact that my bloods are even a smidge elevated is a pretty strong indication of a flare with me. Sometimes I flare and there’es no indication whatsoever in the bloods. Now this is where a doctor relationship would come in handy. If she’d actually known me, known that I’ve had RA for nearly ten years, known that I’ve had umpteen flares in my left knee, known that blood tests are not a helpful indicator with me, known that I have a brain, we could have skipped the pointless bits, more of which are coming up.

‘Ah, well let’s have a look.’ Prod, poke.

‘Aaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaaargh!’

‘Did that hurt when I pressed there?’

‘No, I just thought I’d make screamy gurgling noises for fun.’ (Nope, I didn’t really say that either, I just said yes.)

‘Can you bend it?’

‘This much.’ Demonstrated a very slight bend.

‘Ah. Have you tried pain killers… like paracetamol?’

I’m afraid I just looked at her and laughed, finally managing to choke out a ‘yes’, followed by ‘interspersed with ibuprofen.’ She looked amazed that I’d been able to think of painkillers all by myself.

‘Well I’ll prescribe a course of steroids. Now if they don’t work, we’ll have to consider other possibilities like osteoarthritis, as they should work for RA.’

‘Well, they’ve worked every other time I’ve had them, so touch wood that they will this time too.’

‘Oh … right.’ Look of mild astonishment, either that I’d had them before (it’s in the notes dear) or that I actually knew that I’d had them before, who knows.

So I thanked her very nicely, ’cause I’m a well brung-up penguin … and I might run into her again, and off I went to the chemist to get my steroids.

Again, after nearly ten years of RA, I think I recognise an RA flare when I see one … I really hope I’m not proved wrong and that the steroids do work again this time and it doesn’t turn out to be OA. That would be sooooo embarrassing after this post!

Really hoping to get a full day’s work in

January 26, 2016 at 3:13 pm | Posted in arthrits, arthrits, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, joint pai, rheumatoid arthritis, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 3 Comments
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Well the knee is certainly a whole lot better and I’m now tapering off the steroids – I ended up with 11 days on 40 mg and then a taper down to nothing. The bad news is, not surprisingly, it’s not 100% better yet, and so far I haven’t managed a full day’s work since this started. Fortunately (not from a financial standpoint, but otherwise) we’re not that busy right now. I’m not too worried as that’s often the case in January and there are things simmering away that should come in over the next few months, and it does mean that if I just can’t manage a full day then so be it. At least the boss can’t get cross with me! (Having said that, I’m probably my own harshest critic, so I guess I can get cross with me!)

On top of the whole knee thing, yesterday I had what was pretty much certainly a full-blown methotrexate-related stomach upset, so I’m very glad now that I’m going on the injected stuff in a couple of weeks! Feeling OK today, if a little tired, but I was a complete wreck for a while last night – thank heavens for Imodium is all I can say!

Still, even if I don’t last all day today at work, I’m confident that I’ll be doing so by the end of the week, so things are on the up! I hope things are going well for all of you too.

A bit of an update – I can’t believe it’s been so long!

October 15, 2014 at 1:35 pm | Posted in arthrits, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, joint pai, Me, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 4 Comments
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I can’t believe I haven’t posted since June. I wish I could say that that’s because I had nothing, RA-wise, to post about, but that wouldn’t be strictly true. In fact throughout June, July and August I probably did have ALMOST nothing to post about, but, although I’ve kept off those dratted antiinflmmatatories, things aren’t quite so hot now.

It’s just little niggly things at the moment – niggly knees mostly, as it always is with me, plus waking up in the night and finding my right-hand index finger is very stiff and very painful. I have a horrible feeling this relates to my increase in crocheting lately, and I’m wondering if I’ll be able to complete my Diploma in Crochet … although thankfully there’s no time limit so if it takes me a week to crochet a 4″ square, so be it!

And talking of crafts, I’ve just been to the Knitting and Stitching Show at Alexander Palace – a 3.5 hour journey there, mostly by coach, a 4 hour journey back (due to the coach almost breaking down but managing to limp to our drop-off point in the end!) and a loooong day browsing the exhibitions (so-so), trade stands (fabulous yearly treat for a rural type with few local craft shops!) and enjoying a workshop too (Dorset button making). We went on the Friday and it knocked me FLAT for the rest of the weekend but it was worth it!

I also had my hospital appointment not long ago. To my astonishment it went very well – they called us in individually, so again we didn’t have to line up like ducklings behind the mother-duck nurse, and there was a new rheumy nurse there (well, new to me, and young) who was absolutely delightful – she hasn’t had the soft, caring side knocked out of her by working too long for too little and too many hours at a time … yet. She was very sympathetic and very helpful about the knees, which were playing up at the time, although more from the medical (go on, have them drained, it’s not that bad – hah, like she’d know!) side than the practical ‘help yourself’ side of exercises, cold compresses etc. And thereby lies, in my non-expert opinion, one of the biggest problems with any giant organisation such as the NHS. It’s inevitable that everyone has their own specialties, but they do tend to get siloed. She didn’t offer me physio – but then again … I didn’t ask. In all honesty I didn’t feel I needed it, and perhaps neither did she! I know how to manage the low-level pain now – sometimes I may need reminding, being a dopey penguin, but I do know!

And that lack of ‘joined up thinking’ leads to the next thing – I got a letter recently asking me to ring the surgery to discuss ‘some blood results from the hospital’. Slightly worrying that – especially as it arrived on a Thursday, I didn’t get it until Thursday night and I was off to London on Friday, so couldn’t ring until Monday. Anyway, I rang on Monday. ‘Oh’ says the doc. ‘They want us to check your cholesterol risk.’ And ‘quite right too’ I hear you say. ‘You’re overweight and you should do something about it and they’re right to be vigilant.’ Well, yes, but here’s the thing … the surgery themselves had just checked my cholesterol about three weeks before and established that I was low risk.

If the nurse at the hospital had asked me about it, instead of sending me off for bloods and not even telling me she was checking that, I could have said, ‘They’ve just done that at the surgery. This is my level, I’m apparently low risk.’ Instead, lovely as she was, she wasted the following resources:

  • A blood sucker (aka phlebotomist)
  • The lab doing the work on the cholesterol
  • The hospital secretary
  • The surgery secretary who sent out the letter
  • The GP who had to call me back and discuss what we’d discussed three weeks before

‘Joined up thinking’ is no longer the buzz phrase of the day, and it sadly didn’t work when it was, but a little bit more of it would be a wonderful thing.

On mended knee

June 22, 2014 at 8:57 pm | Posted in Me, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 3 Comments
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Eye Church from the Pennings Nature Reserve

Eye Church from the Pennings Nature Reserve

Thanks for all the comments. Well, we made it back today, and successfully collected the fabric. (If you have no idea what I’m talking about then you’ll need to read the previous post!) Run4Joy – not sure about ‘spry’, the knee isn’t perfect … in fact neither knee is as good as it was a couple of days ago, but both are much, much better than yesterday!

Maggie, good point! We made it back and this time we got to the nature reserve – and very lovely (and flat) it was too. You can’t see in the picture above but between us and the church there’s a lovely river (the River Dove), teaming with damselflies and dragonflies. Most of the (very small) reserve is a wild flower meadow, so a jolly nice place to visit in the summer!

Carla, I’m sure you’re right – I had been overdoing it, so we had a very short and leisurely walk around the reserve and then headed back home and put our feet up. Poor Hubby, having done all the driving two days running … not to mention the drive up to the coast on Friday night for a walk around Cromer, Blakeney and Wells (did I mention I might have overdone it lately?), was more in need of a feet up afternoon than I was!

A day (or two) in my life with RA

March 23, 2014 at 9:58 pm | Posted in arthrits, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, joint pai, Me, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 19 Comments
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This post will be part of the Word Autoimmune Arthritis Day Blog Carnival. WAAD is May 19th 2014 but you can sign up for it now over at the site. This year’s theme is “A Day in the Life of an Autoimmune Arthritis Patient.” I hope I’m not cheating, but I’m going to describe two days – one just post diagnosis and one post-“control” where I am now!

4:00 am A day in March 2008

Wake up hurting – everything’s hurting. My neck and shoulders are very stiff, my back aches, my feet are killing me, one arm is numb and the other has pins and needles going from shoulder to finger-tips – but oddly only the little and ring finger.

Worry – a lot. Come on, I was diagnosed as ‘likely’ are in November last year, and definitely in February  – so how come it’s still not sorted. OMG, what if it never does get sorted? Am I going to end up a wheelchair? Will I cope? Will hubby cope?

And where the heck is that physio appointment they promised me months ago?

4:00 am A day in March 2014

Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzz…..

7:00 am March 2008

Wake up feeling completely un-refreshed and cursing myself for having spent an hour in the middle of the night worrying instead of sleeping. Worry some more as I creak my way gradually out of bed, gently testing bits of me to see how mobile they are. The relief of shaking off the pins and needles and then plunging my hands into warm water is enormous.

7:00 am March 2014

Wake up, blinking the ‘sleep’ out of my eyes. Slight stiffness. Hubby draws the curtains and says, ‘How’s the Penguin?’ ‘Stiff and achy,’ I reply, but then I realise that this is nothing to how it felt a few years ago, really NOTHING, and instantly feel a bit better.

7:30 am March 2008

Take a hydroxychloroquine and a diclofenac and wonder if they’re helping or not. I know I have to wait another couple of months to find out. It’s frustrating!

7:30 am March 2014

Take a hydroxychloroquine and an ‘arcoxia’ cox-2 inhibitor. I had to stop taking the diclofenac eventually after a nasty stomach upset – the arcoxia are supposed to much worse for the stomach, but so far don’t seem to be worrying mine!

8:00 am March 2008

The stiffness is just starting to think about wearing off. My left knee is very swollen and I hobble out to my car using a stick, to head off to work. I’m wondering how I’ll make it through a whole day!

8:00 am March 2014

Stiffness? What stiffness? Did I say I was stiff and achy this morning? Heavens! I’d forgotten. That wore off in about ten minutes.

9:00 am March 2008

Work  – chat to colleague – drink strong coffee – work some more. Try to remember to MOVE because otherwise I freeze into place and struggle to get out of my chair when I need to later.

9:00 am March 2014

Work – chat to colleagues – drink decaffeinated coffee (this change has nothing to do with the RA, but I have rosacea and the symptoms of that are drastically decreased by drinking only decaf coffee rather than ‘caffeinated’), work some more. Move when I want to – it’s not a particular issue any more.

12:00 pm March 2008

Strewth I’m stiff – I got a bit too involved in some interesting work and haven’t moved out of my chair for an hour. Now I’m in the embarrassing situation of needing a ‘comfort break’ rather urgently and thinking it’s going to take me five minutes to un-stiffen enough to get there!

Time for the next diclofenac. Oh no! I’ve left them at home! Mad dash home in the car to get one, and then back to work.

12:00 pm March 2014

Lunch time – get up, stretch a bit, possibly say ‘creak’, which makes my ‘Junior Penguin’ colleagues chuckle, but really I’m quite mobile. Grab a bit of lunch and go for a mile walk – I know it should be longer … and faster … but it’s about what I can manage comfortably in the time I can spare and my knees aren’t right, though much better than they were a few years ago.

Happily no lunch-time tablets any-more – as life-style changes go, this one has had a surprising amount of impact ! I’d really hate to have to go back to trying to remember lunch-time tablets again!

3:00 pm March 2008

Really wondering if I can last until five. If I was on my own I’d be out of here – but I’ve got an employee now and I feel I should set a good example so I stay.

3:00 pm March 2014

Wow – I love this job – time for a bit of a coffee break and then back to some really interesting transcription about language usage … followed, for a bit of a change, by some transcription about sheep diseases! Variety – that’s what I love!

5:00 pm March 2008

‘I’m tired and I wanna go home’ but we’re really busy and I’ve promised someone to get some work back to them this week – I’d better stay a bit longer, even though I feel soooooo tired and achy!

5:00 pm March 2014

I’m outa here – life’s too short! My way of working these days is to delegate or subcontract what I can’t fit in between 8am and 5pm Monday to Friday. I’ve got about 15 hobbies (and one hubby… and friends) and I want time to enjoy them all… especially as, let’s be honest, I don’t know how long I’ll be able to carry on with some of my hobbies, especially those involving a lot of walking or using my hands! I don’t feel negative about it though – things are going well at the moment and I’m making the most of my free time!

6:00 pm March 2008

Still at work.

6:00 pm March 2014

Just leaving a friend’s house. I’ve popped round for a post-work chat and coffee. Feeling pretty fine.

7:30 pm March 2008

Just about manage to get some supper on the table. I only arrived home half an hour ago so it’s ‘oven fish and chips’. 7.5g of methotrexate tonight, with another diclofenac, another hydroxychloroquine and a lansoprazole (stomach settling tablet).

7:30 pm March 2014

We’ve eaten already – I like to eat early and have the evening to play in – especially as I’m usually in bed by 9:00 pm these days – I find an early night makes a huge difference to my general well-being.

Tablets were 17.5g of methotrexate (yeah, it’s gone up a lot but I don’t care – it’s working, and there’s still room for it to go up a bit more … although I do worry sometimes about what happens if/when I’m up to 25g and there’s nowhere else to go  because my symptoms are too mild to get anti-TNFs etc. on the NHS!), and another hydroxychloroquine and a lansoprazole.

9:00 pm March 2008

Getting ready for bed – head still buzzing with what’s happening at work, worries about health, worries that I’m not finding time to do the things I love and speak to the people I love, worries, worries, worries. Heaven knows when I’ll get to sleep. Read a book for a bit to try to take my mind of it.

9:00 pm March 2014

In bed sipping a cup of decaf coffee that hubby’s just made me. Feeling satisfied that I’ve done a bit of Spanish ‘homework’ and managed quite a chunk of embroidery and a bit of crochet this evening, while watching an interesting documentary on the telly and discussing it with hubby later in some depth. Reading a good book on my iPad and feeling very relaxed.

10:00 pm March 2008

Oh no – I really don’t feel sleepy. I’ll read some more and try to relax. ‘Come on Penguin – light’s out’ says Hubby. ‘Just another five minutes’ I say, knowing he’ll be asleep in four and I can carry on reading!

10:00 pm March 2014

Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz…..

11:00 pm March 2008

Better put the light out. Toss, turn, toss, turn.

11:00 pm March 2014

Zzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzzz…

1:00 am March 2008

At last  … zzzzzzzzzzzz…..

1:00 am March 2014

Zzzzzzzzzzzz…

2:00 am March 2014

Wake up – stiff, in pain, pins and needles – wriggle about until I feel vaguely comfortable, lie awake for 20 minutes and eventually drift off to sleep.

2:00 am March 2014

Wake up – roll over – zzzzzzzzzzz…………….

And so another day starts in the life of Pollyanna Penguin …

Review – Physicool – it sure is cool!

October 1, 2013 at 4:57 pm | Posted in arthrits, rheumatoid arthritis, fibromyalgia, joint pai, rheumatoid arthritis (RA) | 3 Comments
Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , ,

The nice folks at Physicool asked me to review their cooling bandage combination pack. I said I’d be very happy to do so provided they didn’t mind a completely honest review – and they kindly agreed and sent me a pack to try out. So here goes:

What is Physicool?

Physicool is a rapid evaporant which can be poured or sprayed onto their bandages. The liquid quickly evaporates into the air, drawing away the heat from the inflamed area and creating a cooling effect,

What is the combination pack?

The combination pack that Ian at Physicool sent me consists of a 3m long bandage and a 500 ml bottle of coolant. The bandage comes in its own small foil packet with coolant already applied, and that packet and the coolant bottle are packaged in another foil packet.

Combination Pack Shot 2

Opening the packs

On first use the seal along the top of both packages has to be torn off. My arthritis hands struggled slightly with the larger pack, but not much, and the smaller pack tore easily. Each pack is then sealed with a typical push-together plastic seal – not sure what those are called but you hopefully get the idea! These open easily.

Applying the bandage

The bandage has to first be squeezed to remove any excess evaporant, but it doesn’t need a very hard squeeze so that didn’t prove a challenge. I used the bandage on my knee – although I had a ‘size A’ bandage which is more appropriate for wrists, ankles etc. The knee was where I had the inflammation though, and actually the size was fine. The bandage is neatly rolled inside the bag and easy to unwind and apply. It has a velcro-style strip which can be attached to itself or to the bandage.

What I liked

  • It works. It cooled the inflamed area really, REALLY fast and that meant the pain went away fast.
  • The bandage is easy to apply.
  • I only needed to use it for half an hour – after that I took off the bandage and my knee still felt really cool for another half an hour. But it should last for up to two hours – and it can then be re-charged and you can carry on using it.
  • It’s portable. I use an ice pack normally but I can’t use that at work because we have no freezer in the building! This is something I can keep at work, and also take on holiday. Fantastic!
  • The coolant supplied with the bandage should last for up to two hours of use – so I’ve got four applications in the bandage before I need to recharge.
  • There should be enough coolant in the recharge bottle for around 8 more thirty-minute uses.
  • The packs are quite easy to open and the bandage was easy to apply and it didn’t slip once I’d put it in place.

What I didn’t like

  • It’s wet. Well, it would have to be of course, because if it wasn’t it wouldn’t evaporate! However, because it is a rapid evaporant it doesn’t feel wet for long.
  • It has a smell. It’s not a bad smell, but it’s definitely a smell. No smell at all would be perfect, but if it has to smell this isn’t a particularly unpleasant one – just very slightly hospitally!
  • It needs to be exposed to the air to work effectively – otherwise it can’t evaporate so well, of course. This means that whichever bit of you is using the bandage has to be uncovered. Not a problem if you want it to be cool, you may think, but what if the knee’s the problem and the only way to ‘expose it’ is to roll up your trousers? that leaves you with a cold ankle and calf.
  • Because it needs to be exposed to the air, when I used it on my knee and then put my leg up, the underneath part was against my footrest, not exposed to the air. This meant I had a wet patch for a while under my leg after I took the bandage off. It did evaporate though!

Do the benefits outweigh the irritations?

DEFINITELY!  Now that I know what the ‘problems’ are for me, I can work around most of them. I can make sure I have a small blanket to cover any bits I don’t want exposed, and if I put my leg up, for instance, I can put it on a foot stool and leave the actually knee unsupported to avoid a wet patch. As to the smell and the temporary wetness – considering how incredibly effective this is at cooling the painful area – I can live with those.

Want to know more?

Watch

They have a page about Physicool and arthritis here. Or visit the websites – physicool.co.uk in the UK, physicool.us in the US, or go to physicool.com to find a local distributor where you are.

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